Tag Archives: Vitamin

A Few Spring Forget Me Not’s

Though Mother Nature has seemingly been a bit torn between seasons here in New York, this week is looking to be more on the side of Spring, and today perhaps Summer, than Winter. Of course there may be an abrupt change of heart in future forecasts; but why not step in time with this moment, revisit some necessary to-do’s, and take a look at this season’s treasures.

1.       Cleanse

I know by now you are fully aware that cleansing is my top of the list recommendation during a change in season. And though I don’t advocate cleansing as a weight loss tactic, I’ll briefly jump on that bandwagon and point out some aesthetic benefits of the cleansing process:

  • It’s a great way to clean the slate and start a new eating plan or diet.
  • It often leaves the tummy noticeably flatter due to the removal of all that un-digested, let’s just call it “matter”, in the intestinal tract.
  • The eyes have been known to brighten and the skin to glow after cleansing.

2.       Replenish Your Allergy Kit

Truth is allergy sufferers have really not gotten a break since last Summer’s A season began. Remember that the warmer winter ushered in an early bloom of several flowers and plants; and my understanding is that we should buckle in for a long haul because those bloomers will not be shortening their stay to account for the early arrival. Just in case you’ve forgotten your natural anti-histamine options:

  • MSM (methylsulfonylmethane), found in seafood, meats and fresh fruit, has antihistamine capabilities that rival those of over the counter allergy meds. Taking 1000mg twice a day has helped me to sneeze and cough less over these last few weeks.
  • Honey, especially the locally harvested, increases your tolerance for the pollen floating through the air and can bring quick relief from allergy symptoms. A tablespoon or two taken at the first sign of a reaction should do the trick.

3.       Delight in Spring Fruits and Veggies

Eating with the season helps us to rotate foods and that not only keeps our diets fresh and diverse, but also helps prevent the development of food allergies. Nutritionally speaking, these spring treats have what it takes to keep us both strong and beautiful.

  • Beets are definitely a rooter to the tooter powerhouse. The green leafy tops are rich in fiber, Vitamin A, and other age defying anti-oxidants. The vegetable’s roots are not only highly regarded for their rich Iron and Vitamin C content; but they also contain the phytochemical Glycine Betaine that counteracts plaque promoting homocysteine and thus helps protect us from stroke and coronary heart disease. Eating beets raw or lightly cooked guarantees the fullest dose of nutrients.
  • Asparagus are definitely among the under-appreciated members of the vegetable family. Hopefully that ceases right here and now as they are excellent sources of several nutrients and therefore offer multiple health benefits. Asparagus contain significant amounts of folates, important to DNA synthesis, and are thus highly beneficial to expectant mothers. They are also rich in B- Vitamins and thereby capable of enhancing both metabolic function and energy production. Another understated asparagus gem is their Vitamin K content; one serving offers 35% of the recommended daily amount. Vitamin K helps our blood to clot, bonds calcium to our bones and may reduce our bodies’ susceptibility to bruising.
  • As delicious as they are, berries usually need no amen corner to boast their benefits. The commonly adored strawberry is not only low on the glycemic index, as all berries tend to be, it is also packed with antioxidants like Vitamin C and critical minerals like Potassium and Magnesium. And due in part to those assets, this celebrity berry is great for joint health. Apparently the high antioxidant content helps keep many arthritis and gout symptoms at bay. Making fighting degeneration, maintaining healthy joint fluid, and preventing toxic build-up all strengths of the strawberry.
  • Few may regard the apricot as the secret beauty weapon it is but that doesn’t change its worthiness of praise. Among many other nutrients, apricots happen to contain more beta- carotene than almost any other fruit. Beta-carotene is one naturally occurring, highly pigmented compound our bodies can use to make the biologically active Vitamin A. Vitamin A is a potent antioxidant associated with preventing premature aging of the eyes and skin. Additionally, apricots are high in fiber and consequently protective to the digestive tract, helping to ward off conditions such as constipation, bloating, irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulosis. Enjoy apricots fresh, canned or dried without sulfur dioxide as its use has been linked to various health issues.

4.       Last But Not Least

Make time to feel the sun and smell the flowers. Tis the season of renewal and sometimes a moment of rebirth can be achieved by simply standing and savoring the day before us. Until next time, take a moment…

Be Still and BeWell

Sources

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/beets.html

http://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-strawberry.html

http://apricotfacts.com/apricots/Health+Benefits+of+Apricots/

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Looking to be Born Again?

Happy New Year folks and welcome to 2012! For me, the start of a new year is an extremely unique and powerful time because it is one of the few times that I actually embrace CHANGE. That’s right, I admit it, I don’t like the Big C. It yanks me from my illusory comfort zone and thrusts me into new frontier and that can feel a little scary and taxing. If it must come, and I keep hearing it’s what this game is all about, then I prefer it sneak in slowly and gently with some distracting fairy dust attached.

But for some reason, during the New Year season I am far less resistant to the ebb and flow and am actually welcoming, optimistic and receptive to it all. A real live grown up about it! And I know I’m not alone.

The heightened awareness of the times gets us cleansing, checking in on our states of health, visiting our doctors and re-evaluating our wellness plans. We are all so brave, ready to disassemble and rebuild ourselves. I love it! So, it got me to thinking. What else? What goes beyond rejuvenation? Bingo.

REGENERATION

To paraphrase Wiki’s entries, regeneration is the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that makes cells and organs resilient to natural fluctuations or events that cause disturbance or damage. The field of regenerative medicine holds the promise of regenerating damaged tissues and organs in the body by replacing damaged tissue and/or by stimulating the body’s own repair mechanisms …

I think I’m feelin that, especially the latter part. The notion that the human body is capable of healing itself is the cornerstone belief of wellness, and enhancing this capability, the primary agenda of its practitioner. Though we don’t have the same skills as some of our tailed, four-legged and sea dwelling friends, we humans do have some organs and parts that are capable of regeneration, namely the skin, muscles, bones, liver and adrenal glands. These organs house some of the most crucial processes within the body and impact our health and wellness in the most critical of ways. Enhancing their innate healing capacities actually gets in front of degeneration and disease and sits us firmly in the seat of prevention. And when we speak of regeneration, what we are most basically speaking of is DNA synthesis and cellular renewal. This is the source; from here a series of biological processes determines how these new cells will be used and what they will become. But complete regeneration not only refers to an organ’s form. It also refers to its function, and certain nutrients can help push the creative process along while supporting the organ’s functional development. Let’s start at the surface and work our way in.

The Skin’s Friends

The skin we live in is the largest of the bodily organs. And as such, it has some very important jobs. It covers and protects the internal body and eliminates its toxins and wastes through sweating. Exfoliation helps to clear away the skin’s dead cells and can be done by bathing with loofahs and brushes. But deeper exfoliation that sparks skin’s renewal can be achieved by adding alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA)  containing substances like milk, strawberries, pineapples and grapes to your bath. Scrubbing salts and sugars are effective as well. Too much, however, can stress the skin and break it down. Be gentle and figure out a schedule that keeps the skin fresh without over doing it. Extreme redness, slight abrasions and inflammation are sure signs you’ve gone too far.

For “inside to out” skin care, eating raw fruits, nuts and vegetables increases skin’s renewal process and the naturally occurring enzymes in unprocessed foods help the body fully access nutrients and use them for skin, muscle and bone construction.

Muscle Master

Until doing research for this post I was naïve to the scope of work performed by glutamine. In the world of sports nutrition it is recommended for muscle recovery; a few months ago a customer educated me on its benefits to the digestive tract; but it was looking further into regeneration that brought me to a point of praise for this amino acid. “Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid found in the muscles of the body. Because it can readily pass the blood-brain barrier, it is known as brain fuel…and is the basis of the building blocks for the synthesis of RNA and DNA”.*

Not surprisingly, glutamine is a star in our defensive line. It increases antioxidant protection and is released by the muscles into the blood stream during times of stress, injury and trauma. It prevents our muscles from wasting away. Consequently, those on bed-rest, with arthritis, managing auto-immune disorders, living with cancer and/or immune deficiency syndrome or trying to overcome sugar and alcohol cravings can benefit from supplemental glutamine in the form of L-glutamine.

L-glutamine can be purchased in pill and powder forms and should be taken as instructed by the product’s label. The supplemental form should also be stored in a completely dry space as moisture will cause it to break down into, among other compounds, ammonia. Not a good thing. Some natural sources include raw spinach and parsley, cabbage and ricotta cheese. Glutamine does not stand up well to cooking. So the raw sources will always be the best.

Bone Builders

While it is certainly true that calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and Vitamin D are necessary to bone’s health and structural reinforcement, actual bone building requires more. Methylsulfonyl-methane (MSM) , a natural compound of the mineral sulfur, is found in all of the body’s connective tissues and is used by the body to build cells for these tissues. Meat, milk, fresh fish, fruits and vegetables all contain MSM, but MSM is easily lost during food processing. Again, the raw approach best insures a natural supply of this nutrient.

MSM along with glucosamine and chondroitin are needed by the body to develop bone. These three are also widely supplemented for joint health and come in a variety of potencies. They are available both individually and together and should be supplemented as directed by the product’s label.

Copper , another mineral found in almonds, avocados, beets, broccoli and garlic, aids in bone formation; and Vitamin K , found in dark leafy greens, yogurt and egg yolks, is essential to the production of bone protein. Follow the less is more rule for both of these as deficiency of either is rare. The current RDA for copper is 1 mg and approximately 100 mcgs for Vitamin K. Neither should be over supplemented without your physician’s awareness and consent.

Designing Your Regenerative Plan

To support an ongoing renewal process, aim to add the natural food sources to your daily diet, and look to the supplemental forms as needed to assist with particular conditions. Our bodies are often a few steps ahead of us. So tune in and respond accordingly. If your seasonal cleanse has left you underwhelmed and wanting, then you too may be due for some regeneration. Next week we’ll take a deeper dive and explore the renewal of a few precious organs. But until then…

Thank you for visiting and supporting BeWellWarrior. I’ve had an amazing time researching and writing these posts and I love reading the responses you provide. I look forward to bringing you more. So feel free to drop a line and tell me what you really want to know.

Armed and Ready to BeWell in 2012!

*Balch, Phyllis A. Prescription for Nutritional Healing, the A-Z Guide to Supplements. New York: Avery of Penguin Putnam Inc, 2002.

Merrily Supplement Free

Many of my clients and customers simply do not believe in supplementation. Maybe, just maybe they’ll entertain my suggestions of Vitamin C for immunity’s sake. But as soon as I start with the antioxidant protection, mood enhancement, energy, blah blah blah, they’re pulling out their guns and loading,” I eat well. I hate pills. I’m allergic.” And I get it. So here’s to you folks who are determined to go full speed ahead into this winter holiday season sans supplements.

First and foremost, go to bed!

My favorite commercial is the one where the mom declares that “…someone needs a time out,” and low and behold she is referring to herself. So in the same spirit, I repeat, grown folks take your a$$ets to bed! Among other things, lack of sleep decreases our cells’ sensitivity to insulin and consequently elevates our blood sugar levels. As we know, the short-term effects of this can be frequent sugar cravings, mood swings and increased irritability; but the more serious long-term effects include obesity and Diabetes. Sufficient sleep will keep you from biting your___’s head off and add some extra years to your lovely life.

Additionally, the amount of stress hormone cortisol present in our system is linked to our circadian rhythm-“a daily cycle of biological activity based on a 24-hour period and influenced by regular variations in the environment, such as the alternation of night and day.”* Regular and predictable sleep patterns help to modulate the secretion of this hormone and a healthier stress response not only makes your hectic day feel more manageable, but it also keeps your waist trimmer and protects you from countless other stress oriented ailments and diseases like stroke and hypertension.  Our bodies’ cortisol levels are generally higher when we wake and typically take a fast drop after breakfast, bringing me to the next supplement free suggestion.

Run; don’t walk, to the breakfast table.

Not only will you naturally regulate your cortisol and blood sugar levels this way, but you will also set yourself up for more appropriate eating patterns during the day. Skipping breakfast has more recently been linked to increased weight gain. This is due in part to the subsequent tendency to eat more throughout the day. In a sense, when we skip this first meal we spend the remainder of the day playing catch-up and can consume an average of 100 calories more than usual as a result.

Another motivator is that breakfast is the perfect opportunity to indulge in heartier and richer foods.  You have the remainder of the day to burn and use those calories, so take advantage and fill your plate:

  • eggs are an exceptional protein source and loaded with choline (for brain, nervous system and liver health); sulfur  (for hair, skin, nail and joint health); and lutein (for eye health)
  • whole grain cereals are rich in minerals and dietary fiber for healthier hearts and colons
  • yogurt is a natural probiotic source that helps replenish our intestinal tracts and maintain stronger immune systems
  • fresh fruits add even more fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to our daily arsenal

Spark up your mid-day snack.

Whether it’s a mini meal or a quick coffee break that gets you through that afternoon slug, putting a little pepper in it will do both your mind and body good. Chiles, paprika and especially cayenne act as stimulants and antispasmodics. They warm the blood, increase circulation and counter act inflammation. In fact one ¼ teaspoon dose taken three times a day is a commonly prescribed herbal tonic for the treatment and prevention of depression, headaches, arthritis, colds and flu.**And if you haven’t had hot chocolate with cayenne, you simply must. Absolutely delightful!

Last but not least-breathe it all in.

It may seem too common of knowledge and therefore not necessary for review, but I am constantly reminded how easy it is to forget to breathe. I catch my clients and myself holding in breath all the time, and as soon as it’s released there’s an increase in power, ease of movement and overall energy. Guaranteed.  Remember the big oxygen bar craze a few years ago? Many of the herbs that enhance mental clarity and capacity, such as Ginkgo Biloba, do so by increasing circulation and oxygen flow to the brain. If you are determined to conquer stress and fatigue this season without a supplemental “middle man”, then try out a breathing technique to push you through.

  • Calm an overactive nervous system– inhale for 4 counts, hold for 7, and exhale for 8. Repeat the cycle three times
  • Energize the mind– inhale and exhale 10 times, as you count each inhalation one by one to the tenth breath in. Repeat this cycle four times.

To all of you going Commando this season, I’m in your corner and wishing you the very best. Be sure to take a moment, to take care, and of course, to BeWell!

*http://www.thefreedictionary.com/circadian+rhythm

**Michael Tierra. The Way of Herbs. Pocket Books:NY, NY, 1998.

Stress Buster, Gut Blaster, Mind Mender-What Doesn’t Rhodiola Do?

Greetings folks, during last week’s post I proclaimed  Resvitale’s  Cocoa Energy Restore my little holiday secret, not only for its energizing and mood enhancing powers but also for its inclusion of three highly regarded adaptogenic herbs- Schisandra, Ashwagandha and Rhodiola. Quick study break:

“Adaptogens deliver minute shocks of mild stress that condition your physiology to respond to more major stresses in a favorable way. Adaptogens exert a normalizing effect, allowing organisms to increase healthy functions that are impaired by stress, and to decrease unhealthy responses that are triggered by stress, without any risk of ‘overshooting’ and creating an unbalanced response…adaptogens simply enhance the body’s ability to maintain homeostasis and fight age-inducing stress.”*

So, as the season of giving rolls in, I’ve been paying particular attention to how much I give in to anxiety and lack-luster energy. I haven’t researched the exact stats, but I’d venture to say that this time of year is at least one of the most marred by those annoying, albeit momentarily, incapacitating little illnesses.  AND I REFUSE TO GO DOWN LIKE THAT!!!  Sorry to be so aggressive in my declaration, but I am extra determined this year. Anyhoo, in my quest for efficient and cost-effective ways to stay healthy, invigorated and yet still at Level 2 (as my friends say), I’ve directed my attention to the class of nutrients most qualified for the job. Now, I admit that I tend to fall fast. Frankly, I first developed a serious infatuation with Schisandra and Ashwagandha because their names are so dog gone cool. And now, I am seeing that Rhodiola too is a genuine keeper. Let’s get started.

Rhodiola Rosea typically grows in colder, mountainous environments and has been used for centuries by natives of Central Asia and Northern Europe to combat the resulting stresses in living with the colder temperatures and higher altitudes of those regions. The root of this flowering plant has and continues to be the more studied part and is therefore most commonly supplemented. There are many healthful nutrients contained within Rhodiola giving it the ability to serve in several different capacities including antioxidant, antiviral and antibacterial. By definition, adaptogens work their magic in a number of different ways through various biological systems, but what I find most appealing and seasonally appropriate about this one is its ability to 1) reduce our production of the stress hormone cortisol 2) seemingly outwit anxiety and 3) prevent toxin induced stress to liver cells. Let’s be real, this time of year can usher in a serious case of the “I need a stiff one to take the edge off’s”, so (not suggesting a means to over indulge in unhealthy behavior) any assistance in the area of damage control is much appreciated.

Our #1 Frenemy 

Cortisol is the hormone released by our bodies when we encounter stressful situations. In short bursts for brief periods of time it helps us to survive what the mind perceives to be threatening circumstances. Remember the “stress response” cycle that kicks in gear when confronted with these scenarios– rush of adrenaline, increased heart rate and blood pressure and elevated blood sugar levels. It serves our survival in the short-term, but can dramatically cut our life span in the long. Frequent, repeated release of cortisol with little to no recovery time between is a consequence of chronic stress, and the dangers of chronically elevated cortisol are weight gain in the abdomen (more work for the heart), hypertension, hyperglycemia and suppression of immune function. Rhodiola confronts the stress response cycle by acting directly on,” the brain – adrenal gland system to reduce cortisol production while enhancing stress resistance…”*

So, less cortisol without losing the ability to perform and overcome stress, I’ll take it.

Fear Factor

In studies conducted on actual human subjects (not that mice don’t have their problems too, but…), participants struggling with symptoms of general anxiety disorder-frequent, excessive worry, difficulty concentrating, irritability, muscle tension, sleep disturbances-experienced significant reductions in their symptoms after receiving 340mg of Rhodiola Rosea extract daily for 10 weeks.

Ok ten weeks, taking us through the New Year and straight into the recovery phase. Something to look forward to.

Liver Lover

The liver acts as our body’s filter. Macro and micro nutrients, hormones, supplements, medications, alcohol and an innumerable amount of other substances are processed by the liver. In many ways, our body’s health depends on our liver. As an antioxidant, Rhodiola protects the cells of the liver from damage by toxins and other stressors. It has also shown the capacity to reduce liver dysfunction and even restore the liver’s own natural antioxidants.

Whether you’re boosting your immunity with vitamins, your disposition with spirits, or your recovery with medication, you can’t go wrong caring for the liver.

And If That Weren’t Enough

Rhodiola is also known to:

  • Improve physical performance by increasing oxygen intake and decreasing muscle damage
  • Decrease inflammation
  • Protect and restore brain cells
  • Enhance immune function
  • Inhibit cancer cell growth
  • Slow the aging process

Rhodiola can be supplemented alone or in combination with other adaptogens. Beware of supplements that only contain extractions of the Rhodiola constituent Saldroside. Many manufacturers believe it to be the most healthful nutrient in the herb, and only supply that. Opt for the whole root extractions instead because there are many other beneficial nutrients within the Rhodiola herb. And, as with most herbs, the nutrients within are each naturally present in the most healthful amounts and balanced in a way that best compliments the other components. Choose a supplement that provides about 200-300mg of Rhodiola Rosea root extract per serving, standardized to supply the individual constituents of the herb in the amounts most consistent with the natural plant. Nature knows best. Trust in her and as always…

BeWell

*Jan Whiticomb, “Reducing the Risks of High Cortisol,” LifeExtension September/October 2011: 46 and 49.

The Fat Pac: Allies, Enemies and Overkill

The Ancient Egyptians knew that feeding a pati...
Image via Wikipedia

Many of my clients and customers prefer to get their nutrients from food for  various reasons including their individual tolerances, concern for their other medications or simply their own prerogative. Above all, I support the individual pursuit of wellness and respect each person’s right to decide what works best for them. The following is for those still on the fence with nutritional supplements because of the
seemingly exhausting process involved in sifting through all the circulating information.

Does the body absorb everything in a single multivitamin?

What vitamins are best taken together and which ones should be taken alone?

Can I take too much, and will that make me sick?

These may be the simplest yet smartest questions to ask when contemplating a supplement plan. The first two are more straight forward than the last. So, you may need to take back the reins at that point, but the following breakdown should enlighten your way there. Let’s begin.

Allies, Enemies and Overkill-The Fat Pac

The typical multi vitamin, multi mineral supplement combines all of the essential nutrients in one formulation, providing the minimum recommended daily amount of each nutrient contained. There are vitamins that work better with and because of one another. These are said to have a “synergistic relationship” and can be taken together without interfering with one another’s work in the body.

On the other hand, there are nutrients that compete with one another for the body’s attention and interfere with each other’s absorption or uptake by the body. There are also other factors, both internal and external, that can impede on a nutrient’s ability to do its work. And sometimes, a vitamin can be its own worst enemy. The Fat Soluble Vitamins-A, D, E & K- are a perfect example. They are similar in that they are all transported through the body by our dietary fat and then stored (though some more than others) within our own body fat when not fully used at the time they’re taken.
Consequently, over supplementing them is not necessary or advised.

The widely accepted belief is that these are best utilized when taken before breakfast or bed. But they can be taken on either an empty stomach or following a fatty meal, and many authorities also recommend taking them separately from the Water Soluble
Vitamins
.

Vitamin

 Daily Needs

Sources

Alliances

Competitors

Toxicity

A 10,000 IUs Liver, Fish Liver, Carrots Vit.C & E help prevent the loss of stored Vit.A and Zinc is
needed to release the body’s stores
Excessive Iron intake More likely with synthetic A than Beta Carotene. Symptoms include
pressure headaches, nausea, dizziness, abdominal pain and hair loss.
D 800 mg Sunshine, Cod Liver Works best with Vit.A & sufficient Calcium and Phosphorus
(800mg/day)
Sunscreen More than 1000-1500 IUs/day for a month can cause diarrhea, headaches
and the hardening of the body’s soft tissues
E 400-800 IUs Vegetable, seed and nut oils Selenium (50-200 mcg) increases Vit.E’s potency Iron reduces the body’s absorption of E More than 1200 IUs may suppress the immune system
K 75-300 mcg Dark leafy greens, Alfalfa, Kelp Vit.K uses Potassium and Calcium to facilitate blood clotting within
the body
Too much E & Calcium can reduce K’s uptake Synthetic K3 can cause toxicity symptoms-sweating, flushing,
tightness of the chest- when the body does not eliminate the excess * toxicity is rare

A Little Food for Thought

  1. If your diet and lifestyle provide you with even moderate amounts of the Fat Pac, then you may want to supplement them on an as needed basis and focus more on their water-soluble and mineral allies for your every day program.
  2. You may also want to prioritize vitamin D and E during the fall and winter seasons.

Generally these seasons are less sunny than the spring and summer so our most abundant source of vitamin D is compromised.

Vitamin E is an important immune booster that can help prevent the onset of colds and flu. And, it isn’t stored by the body as much as the other fat soluble vitamins. So, toxicity is less likely.

That should do for now folks. Until next week…

Keep it Simple and BeWell!

Back to Basics

Lately I’ve been getting a lot of questions on the basics of supplementation. So, I thought it a good time to add to our FAQs. The following are just a few of the most commonly asked.

I eat lots of fruits and vegetables. Do I really need to take vitamins?

I envy those who somehow manage to get the recommended 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. So clearly, I am not one despite knowing and believing in the importance of this practice. I also lead a very hectic and at times stressful life that is made possible in part by my partaking of caffeine, an alcoholic bev here and there and, now that it is getting colder, those lovely decadent and forbiddingly rich foods. All reasons why I feel I need a vitamin supplement.

But if you are a relatively healthy person, not taking any medications, consuming limited amounts of caffeine and alcohol, not smoking and easily managing your current lifestyle and stress level, then supplementing additional nutrients is probably unnecessary.

Some other factors for consideration are whether you are a meat and/or fish eater or are strictly a vegetarian. There are some crucial nutrients such as Vitamins A and D that are most abundantly found in animal foods. Additionally unless you are eating most of your fruits and vegetables in their raw forms, you may not be getting all of the nutrients the plant foods have to offer.

Your doctor may know best on this one, and should tell you when you are deficient in any vitamins or minerals. And, supplementation doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment. You may find that it is only appropriate for you at certain times such as a change in seasons, busier and more stressful times like the holidays, or when you feel the onset of a cold or other ailment. You may also find that during these times it’s not all of the vitamins you need to supplement but just a few like A, C and E for immune support.

What is meant by the terms “fat and water-soluble” and what difference do they make with vitamins?

Our basic vitamins are broken into two categories-fat soluble and water-soluble. The fat soluble ones- A, D, E and K-are found within the lipids (fat) of plants and animals. They are transported from our food to our bodies by essential, healthy dietary fats where they can be stored in our own body fat for future use. Because our bodies generally maintain a reserve of the fat soluble vitamins, over supplementation of them without doctor’s direction, consent and supervision is neither necessary nor healthy, especially over extended periods of time. These vitamins may be taken with or without food; but they are best taken before breakfast and/or before bed. You can also take them following a meal containing fatty foods. And although some experts recommend taking them separately from the water-soluble ones, the jury is still out. Some of the fat soluble vitamins even work better when taken with the water-soluble ones, namely A, C and E.

Water soluble vitamins-the B Family and Vitamin C- are found mostly in raw fruits and vegetables, don’t stand up well to heat and other forms of food processing and, in this way, are less stable than fat soluble vitamins.  The water-soluble vitamins are not abundantly stored in the body. It easily excretes what it does not need of these. This means we need to maintain a consistent daily intake of them and can generally take them in doses well over the recommended daily allowance without doing harm. The water-soluble vitamins are also best taken with food because they need to be dissolved and digested to be used by the body.

What’s the best way to take my vitamins-pills, powders or liquid?

This really depends on your individual system, more specifically your digestive system. But generally speaking the body has an easier time breaking down and absorbing powders and liquids than it does hard tablets. Many experts doubt even a strong digestive system’s ability to effectively access and absorb the nutrients cased in large hard tablets. The powder filled capsules are great because they are easily digested and you usually don’t have to suffer through tasting them to take them. Vegetarians however should check that the capsule is plant-based and not made of animal gelatin. There are also Kosher and Halal capsules available now. New Chapter is one manufacturer that provides these options. Parents of younger children may want to use a liquid vitamin supplement for their kids because they are most easily swallowed.

What is the shelf life of a liquid or powdered supplement once you’ve opened it and how should you store them?

First things first, always check the supplement’s container for an expiration date before you buy it. My understanding is that unopened, they’ll last a couple of months beyond that date. Once opened, I recommend using liquids, powders, whole food sourced, organic and raw supplements within their supply period. If it is a month supply, then try to use it within a month. Unless a supplement has changed colors, smells sour or rancid or has changed in its consistency it probably hasn’t “gone bad”, but the nutrients contained within it may have lost some potency.

For proper storage of a supplement, also check the container. Most pills should be stored in a cool dry place. If the nutrients are light-sensitive the manufacturer should have packaged them in dark plastic or glass containers. Live and raw supplements can usually be refrigerated safely, and I prefer to do the same for liquids unless otherwise directed by the manufacturer.

With powders like our beloved Green Vibrance, I actually had the privilege of speaking with their company rep years ago and he advised me to store the product in the freezer to extend its shelf life. Even though Green Vibrance is a freeze-dried supplement, making freezer storage logical, I now store all powdered vitamins in the freezer for safe keeping.

In the interest of time and respect for your other commitments-yes I know you have a life that does not evolve around the world of supplements like SOME people…well…me, I will pause here for now and continue next week with more on vitamin allies and enemies. Oh the saga!

Until then, Take Care and BeWell! 

Pumpkin’s Power

Happy Halloween! I have to admit that this is one of my favorite days of the year, so a minute of pumpkin worship in its honor must be given. Everyone is long accustomed to indulging in the traditional pumpkin pie throughout the holiday season, and more recently pumpkin loaves, soups and muffins have joined the list of autumn treats. Yet the nutritional value of this fruit makes it worthy of consumption all year long.

Pumpkin’s Nutrients, The Anatomical Breakdown

Starting with its skin, the rich orange pigmentation is a naturally high source of beta carotene. This converts in the body to Vitamin A, and is highly regarded as one of the most important antioxidant vitamins and most potent anti-aging nutrients.

Along to the pulp. Also rich in beta carotene, it contains a good amount of fiber and water making it helpful to digestion, colon health, blood sugar balance and weight management. One half cup contains 5 grams of fiber, that’s over 12% of the recommended 40 grams per day!

Luckily, the pumpkin seed’s nutritional benefits are no secret. They are high in protein, minerals, essential fatty acids and phytosterols. Their protein content makes them a good alternative to meat, and the minerals supplied keeps them on the list of healthy snack options. Some highly concentrated minerals are:

  • Iron- the blood builder
  • Magnesium-the muscle relaxer and de-stressor
  • Potassium- the regulator of water balance
  • Zinc– the immune enhancer and wound healer

Both the Essential Fatty Acids (omega 3 and 6) and the phytosterols (plant sterols) aid the cardiovascular system by decreasing inflammation and decreasing cholesterol. Phytosterols do this by competing with other cholesterol for absorption, and this competition keeps the LDL, aka “bad cholesterol”, levels low. The EFAs also support blood vessel, nerve and tissue health, all important components to increased heart health.**Note: Heart disease is still the leading cause of mortality in women**

Pumpkin’s Potential

The benefits of this superior fruit do not stop with the above list. Pumpkin is also used in the treatment of several ailments and illnesses. Some of its uses are more supported by anecdotal evidence than scientific, but others are in the process of clinical testing and pumpkin’s future as a healing plant is looking bright.

  • Prostate HealthPumpkin seeds have long been used as a general preventive to prostate problems, but research is indicating that the specific benefit is to preventing benign prostate enlargement and the subsequent complications with urinary flow. This is possibly through the high amounts of zinc. Many prostatitis and prostate cancer patients have been found to have low levels of zinc. A healthy prostate gland typically contains high concentrations of the mineral.
  • Sexual Function– Again zinc takes center stage, and this time it is for the benefit of both males and females. We’ve all heard of the oyster’s reputation… and, by the way, they contain over 10 times the zinc of other foods. But, increased desire is not the only benefit, especially for men. This critical mineral is necessary to normalize testosterone production and maintain reproductive fluids.
  • Mood Enhancement– This time the amino acid tryptophan, also found in pumpkin seeds, gets the credit. Tryptophan is used by our bodies to make serotonin. And serotonin is necessary to proper mood balance and sleep. One gram of pumpkin seeds has the same amount of tryptophan found in that warm cup of milk. More great news for vegetarians!

That’s plenty for now, but trust me. I could go on and on with the power of pumpkin, but I must get ready for the parade and trick or treaters! Have a blast tonight and of course…

Be Safe and BeWell

Armed and Immune: Part I-The VitaTrio

So here they come again, the ever-present scratchy throat, occasional sniffle, and then the full on sneeze. Could be a cold; could be allergies. Regardless, it is annoying and not at all unusual for these times of the year.

That space of time between two seasons is about serious transformation and our bodies are focused on transitioning and adapting to the upcoming changes.The brunt of burden falls upon our immune systems, and their jobs are multifold. They must properly identify a threat, confine and rid the body of it, and store the information for later use. And this has to been done efficiently, in a way that does not over tax because if and when we face that threat again, the immune system is expected to handle the situation even better than before.

Our job is to empower our systems by thinking positively, resting properly, and managing our stress levels. We can also help the process along by feeding it potent disease fighting nutrients. The selection of immune enhancers to choose from is immense, and we’ll cover both the tried and true as well as some lesser known. First up, the ACE Vita Trio!

 Vitamin A in what is called its “preformed
state” is known as Retinol. And yes, this is the same form that has taken over
the cosmetic industry’s anti-aging department. Retinol is found most abundantly
in fish liver oil – Grandma was right all along–  egg yolks, cream and butter. The
form converted to Vitamin A by our bodies, aka “Provitamin A”, is the
beta-carotene found in yellow and orange fruits and veggies and dark leafy
greens.

Vitamin A, among many other
things, is responsible for protecting, healing and growing bodily tissues
including bones, skin and the fine linings and membranes of our internal organs
and cells. It works best with sufficient levels of fellow antioxidant nutrients
Vitamin E and Zinc,”… and an adequate intake of protein”. * Our bodies need at
least 5000 IUs per day of Vitamin A to avoid deficiency. 10,000 IUs is a good
and safe amount to take in on a daily basis, but 20,000-30,000 IUs per day may
be best for those managing stressful lives and dealing with occasional anxiety.
Two medium-sized carrots a day provide the body with about 10 to 15,000 IUs of
beta-carotene that the upper intestines and liver can convert into the
necessary 5000 IUs of Vitamin A. Keeping your body stocked with adequate levels
of Vitamin C and E prevents our stores of Vitamin A from running low.

Quick Tip: Check the quality of
your night vision for indications of a Vitamin A deficiency. It is also necessary
 to the production of the chemical that allows us to see in the dark.

The Citrus V

Vitamin C, found abundantly in citrus fruits, is probably the most
relied upon vitamin of all and for good reason. It is a crucial anti-oxidant
vitamin that not only helps prevent the creation of disease-causing free radicals, it also protects the other antioxidant vitamins A and E.
Vitamin C, aka Ascorbic Acid, is not produced by the body,  and so must be obtained through our
diets. It is only found in fruits and vegetables and is most available in fresh
raw produce as its lack of stability makes it difficult to survive the cooking process.

Many are aware of the citrus vitamin’s aid to the immune system.
Anecdotal and scientific evidence exists to support its use for everything from
the common cold to cancer. However, you may not know its role in mood balance,
a significant contributor to immune system integrity. Vitamin C aids in the
metabolism of both Tyrosine and Tryptophan. Tyrosine and Tryptophan, as
previously covered, work hand in hand
for the nervous system to counteract anxiety and mild to moderate depression.
They keep us in a positive mind state and therefore more resistant to illness.

Additionally, Vitamin C aids the production of Thyroid Hormone, the
metabolism and elimination of cholesterol and the formation and maintenance of
the collagen that is present in all of our bodies’ connective tissues-skin,
joints, capillary walls, bones, teeth, you name it!

The minimum recommended daily amount is 60 mg for the average adult, 80
mg for expecting mothers and 35 mg for infants. Higher amounts are required
during stressful times and times of decreased immune function. The adult body
will absorb no more than about 1000 mg at a time and excrete any amount that it
does not need. For this reason, a time released Vitamin C supplement is
recommended to insure full absorption of this invaluable nutrient.

Vitamin E-Tocopherol

The tocopherol family, was first isolated from wheat germ oil (still
many’s preferred supplement form) and is found in the protective coverings of all
grains, seeds and nuts. To safely extract the Vitamin E from the source, one
must do so naturally such as by cold pressing the grain or seed. Due to
this heat sensitivity, the resulting oils should be consumed uncooked.
Drizzling a cold pressed nut oil over salads, veggies and meats is a great way
to boost the antioxidant value of your meal; and if your diet is heavy in
unsaturated fats, this addition  will go a long way towards improving your cardiovascular health.

“ vitamin E’s key function is to modify and stabilize blood fats so that the blood vessels,
heart, and entire body are more protected ”. *

That’s quite an order for one vitamin, but certainly not beyond its
capabilities. Much research and study is being done on the tocopherol family to
determine its benefit to ailments ranging from protection against the toxic
effects of smoke and alcohol to prevention of autoimmune diseases. What is
clear now is that it does enhance immunity and is particularly effective at
treating viruses. We also know that Vitamin E’s abilities are amplified by its
fellow antioxidant friends Vitamin A and C.

 Quick Tip:To get the greatest bang for
 your buck, supplement the potent D-Alpha tocopherol form and take it in the
morning before breakfast or at night before bed. Recommended daily doses range
 anywhere from 400-600 IUs for prevention to 800-1600 IU’s for healing. Always
start on the lower end and increase your dosage gradually. And always consult
with your health care provider for any specific considerations you should be
mindful of while supplementing.

The ACE trio can be taken separately as part of a nutritional healing program or together for general antioxidant protection. And as you’ll see in this series, many great formulas combine these with other medicinal nutrients for comprehensive immune care. More on those next week, until then…

BeWell!

*Elson M. Haas, M.D., Staying Healthy with Nutrition, the Complete Guide to Diet and Nutritional Medicine. Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts, 1992